Joe Labianca gave the keynote address at INSEAD's Network Evolution Conference in Fontainebleau, France on Saturday, October 27.


Congratulations to Huiwen Lian and her co-authors (Linde Liang, Douglas Brown, Samuel Hanig, Lance Ferris, & Lisa Keeping) on being awarded an Ig Nobel Prize from Harvard University for their research, “Righting a wrong: Retaliation on a voodoo doll symbolizing an abusive supervisor restores justice,” The Leadership Quarterly, Feb., 2018. The research used voodoo dolls to explore how and why employees retaliate against abusive supervisors. The prize, announced Sept.


Steve Borgatti and Joe Labianca, in collaboration with the College of Medicine and the College of Pharmacy, have been awarded a 2-year grant worth $425,745.

Entitled “Using Social Networks to Map and Evaluate Team Science Across CTSA (Center for Translation Science Award) hubs”, the project has three aims: (a) Map emergent research communities in CTSA hubs and obtain a scientific profile for each hub, (b) Assess the impact of CTSA programs on scientific collaboration, and (c) Evaluate the effect of CTSA-induced collaboration on the research productivity of individuals and teams.


The University Partnership in Business Administration in Pakistan was established in 2013 with $1.6 million dollars in funding from the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad to establish a partnership between the Gatton College of Business and Economics and five universities in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province of Pakistan (Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, IMSciences, Kohat University of Science and Technology, University of Peshawar, and University of Science and Technology Bannu.


   Congratulations to Dan Halgin on being selected to receive the inaugural Academy of Management Organization and Management Theary Research Committee Service Award. This award was created by the OMT Executive Committee to recognize the valuable service provided by the most dedicated members of the research committee. Winners of the award have served on the committee for more than five years and have stellar records during their tenure. Dan will receive the award certificate at the Academy of Management Annual Meetings, August 12-16, in Chicago


 The Board of Trustees named Dan Brass as a University Research Professor at their May 1 meeting.  The designation is awarded to "recognize and publicize research accomplishments of scholars across the full range of disciplines at UK."  Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis noted Brass' pioneering research in social network theory, the establishment of the LINKS Center for Social Network Analysis, and the more than 22,000 citations to his research.  Brass joins colleague Steve Borgatti as the second University Research Professor from the Department of Management. 


 The LINKS Center for Social Network Analysis hosted the ION8, the eight meeting of the Intra-Organizational Networks Conference.  Scholars from ten different countries met in the Gatton College to present and discuss their latest research findings on the effects of social networks in organizations.  Thanks to conference coordinator Dan Halgin and Connie Blakemore for a very successful two days of stimulating organizational network research.  


 Scott Soltis and Dan Brass (with David Lepak, U. of Massachusetts Amherst) had their paper, "Social Resources Management: Integrating Social Network Theory and Human Resource Management," accepted for publication in Academy of Management Annuals. 


 

Dan Halgin's research, Halgin, D. S. Glynn, M. A. and Rockwell, D. Organizational actorhood and the management of paradox: A visual analysis, was accepted for publication at Organization Studies. 

Also, congratulations to Dan on receiving a grant of $1550 from the Vice President for Research UK to be used for hosting our 2018 ION conference.


In his dissertation, Tejas Channagiri, a PhD candidate in strategic management at Gatton, investigates the role of status differences among firms in impacting their motivation to launch competitive moves against one another. The question is an interesting and important one to answer because extant research makes equivocal predictions. Some research indicates that status hierarchies are characterized by lower status actors accepting rather than questioning their position within the hierarchy.