Professor David Hardesty has an upcoming article in the Journal of Consumer Psychology.

Farmer, Adam, Blair Kidwell, and David M. Hardesty (2020), “Helping a Few a Lot or Many a Little: Political Ideology and Charitable Giving.”

The abstract is as follows:


Study.com has done the research to determine the top 50 marketing schools in the United States. After looking at information like degrees offered, concentration options, accreditations, clubs and networking opportunities available to students, and information from the U.S. Department of Education, the University of Kentucky is ranked #17!


Professor Dan Sheehan's paper, “Isolating Price Promotions: The Influence of Promotional Timing On Promotion Redemption” was accepted for publication by the Journal of the Association of Consumer Research.


Brian Murtha's paper (with Kevin Chase), “Selling to Barricaded Buyers,” has been accepted at the Journal of Marketing. In business-to-government and business-to-business transactions, suppliers often have limited access to buyers during the buying process. The authors term these buyers “barricaded buyers.”


University of Kentucky Information Technology Services (ITS) recently announced the recipients of their annual Customer Excellence Award for Leadership in IT Advancement.


Haipeng (Allan) Chen will co-chair the SCP Boutique Conference on the Global Consumer (July 9-10, 2020, Singapore.)


"Whom to Hire and How to Coach Them: A Longitudinal Analysis of Newly Hired Salesperson Performance" by Alexis Allen and others, was recently published in The Journal of Personal Selling and Sales Management. 


“The Price of Power: How Firm’s Market Power Affects Perceived Fairness of Price Increases” by Lu Zhi, Lisa Bolton, Sharon Ng, and Haipeng (Allan) Chen has been accepted for publication by the Journal of Retailing. Abstract below. 


New research from Dan Sheehan has been accepted by the Journal of Consumer Research.

In this paper, titled "Saving Your Self: How Identity Relevance Influences Product Usage,” Sheehan documents an "identity conservation effect," in that consumers are less likely to use products related to their identity (such as notepads or candy that display a University of Kentucky logo) compared to nonidentity products because the tradeoff between how it feels to own and use such a product.


Assistant Professor & Ashland Oil Research Fellow, Adam Craig has been named Membership Manager for the Association for Consumer Research.